Propagating Roses

BUDDING

Roses bought from the nurseryman have all been grown as budded plants.

Budding consists of taking a bud or ‘eye’ of the chosen variety and inserting it in the bark of a selected form of Rosa canina (common briar) or R. multiflora. This is known as the stock and it provides the roots of the new plant which is sold by the nurseryman about 15 months later.

BUDDING OF STANDARDS

Both briar and rugosa stock can be used for standards. For these the actual bud-ding is the same as for bush roses, although the buds are inserted in a different position. When planting briar standards, remove all eyes except two opposite each other at the top. These will produce lateral stems in the spring. Insert one bud into each of these laterals, making the T-cut as close as possible to the main stem. Rosa rugosa standards are another matter. Insert the buds in either side of the main stem itself, directly under the top growths. R. rugosa stock resists drought better than the briar but is not successful on chalky soils.

CUTTINGS

Propagation by cuttings is not nearly as successful as by budding. Commercially the method is quite impracticable since a shoot which provides several buds only yields one cutting, and budding is much quicker. Even if the cutting should root, it may subsequently die or fail to make a decent-sized bush. Hybrid teas are usually failures, but floribundas are likelier to succeed, the crimson-scarlet Frensham in particular making a reasonable plant in most cases. Climbers and ramblers, also many of the old-fashioned varieties such as the albas, centifolias, gallicas and Bourbons, ‘strike’ fairly readily and eventually make satisfactory plants. July and August are the best months for taking cuttings. Leave the cuttings in the soil for about 15 months, then move them to their permanent quarters, where they should bloom the following summer.

06. September 2013 by admin
Categories: Gardening History, Plant Biology, Top Tips | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Propagating Roses

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