Category Archives for Tips and Advice

Male fern: Dryopteris

The male fern, a member of the Dryopteridaceae family that includes about 200 species of deciduous and evergreen ferns, is native to the forest areas of the northern hemisphere. Many of the frost-resistant varieties have very decorative, pinnate fronds and … Continue reading

21. September 2017 by admin
Categories: Tips and Advice | Comments Off on Male fern: Dryopteris

Narrow-leaved bellflower: Campanula persicifolia

This species is another member of the large Campanula genus that belongs to the Campanulaceae family, native to southern and eastern Europe and the temperate zones of Asia. It grows 80 cm (32 in) high and forms dense rosettes with … Continue reading

21. September 2017 by admin
Categories: Tips and Advice | Comments Off on Narrow-leaved bellflower: Campanula persicifolia

Blazing star: Liatris spicata

Liatris spicata is native to central and eastern North America. It is not immediately apparent that L. spicata is a member of the Compositae family because its flowers are so different. Also known as button snakeroot, this low-growing herbaceous perennial … Continue reading

21. September 2017 by admin
Categories: Tips and Advice | Comments Off on Blazing star: Liatris spicata

Bellflower: Campanula carpatica

This species of the Campanula genus, a member of the Campanulaceae family, is native to the Carpathian mountains as the name suggests. It is a bushy plant up to 30 cm (1 2 in) high that forms dense clumps of … Continue reading

21. September 2017 by admin
Categories: Tips and Advice | Comments Off on Bellflower: Campanula carpatica

Aster novi-belgii

The Aster genus that includes over 250 species of deciduous and evergreen herbaceous perennials that are all suitable for growing in containers on balconies and terraces. The Aster novi-belgii is native to the east coast of North America where they … Continue reading

21. September 2017 by admin
Categories: Tips and Advice | Comments Off on Aster novi-belgii

Bitterwort: Lewisia cotyledon

The genus Lewisia is a member of the Portulaceae family of about 20 species of deciduous or evergreen herbaceous perennials that are all native to the Rocky Mountains. L. cotyledon is an evergreen herbaceous perennial with fleshy, dark green leaves, … Continue reading

07. September 2017 by admin
Categories: Tips and Advice | Comments Off on Bitterwort: Lewisia cotyledon

Ground ivy: Glechoma

The genus Glechoma belongs to the Labiatae family includes twelve species of creeping, mat-forming, hardy perennials that grow almost everywhere in Europe. Their stems root at the nodes and quickly form a carpet of coarsely toothed, round to oval, hairy … Continue reading

07. September 2017 by admin
Categories: Tips and Advice | Comments Off on Ground ivy: Glechoma

Snake’s beard: Ophiopogon

Native to east Asia, Ophiopogon is a member of the Convallariaceae family and is particularly appreciated for its tufts of handsome, evergreen grass-like leaves. O. jahuran is native to Japan and not frost-hardy; it is therefore best cultivated as a … Continue reading

07. September 2017 by admin
Categories: Tips and Advice | Comments Off on Snake’s beard: Ophiopogon

Purple moor grass: Molinia caerula

This genus of perennial grasses only has two species that grow on heath and moorland in Europe and Asia. Its gold brown autumn colours and elegant habit make it a very decorative container plant for balconies and terraces. Purple moor … Continue reading

07. September 2017 by admin
Categories: Tips and Advice | Comments Off on Purple moor grass: Molinia caerula

Switch Grass: Panicum Virgatum

Many of the 400 species of the Panicum genus, a member of the Poaceae family, are particularly popular with florists for their elegant panicles of spikelets. Switch grass is an excellent visual screen and provides effective protection against the wind … Continue reading

07. September 2017 by admin
Categories: Tips and Advice | Comments Off on Switch Grass: Panicum Virgatum

← Older posts

Facebook

Get the Facebook Likebox Slider Pro for WordPress